Ms. - Usage

Usage

The American Heritage Book of English Usage states that: "Using Ms. obviates the need for the guesswork involved in figuring out whether to address someone as Mrs. or Miss: you can’t go wrong with Ms. Whether the woman you are addressing is married or unmarried, has changed her name or not, Ms. is always correct." The Times (UK) states in its style guide that: "Ms is nowadays fully acceptable when a woman wants to be called thus, or when it is not known for certain if she is Mrs or Miss". The Guardian, which restricts its use of honorific titles to leading articles, states in its style guide: "use Ms for women... unless they have expressed a preference for Miss or Mrs".

In business, "Ms." is the standard default title for women until or unless an individual makes another preference known, and this default is also becoming more common socially in metropolitan areas. The default use of Ms. is also championed by a number of etiquette writers, including Judith Martin (a.k.a. "Miss Manners").

In areas such as the American South, a woman's first name or "Miss", with the inclusion of her first name is the title used and generally preferred for women of any age regardless of marital status. Similar variations in culture can be found in different occupational or social venues.

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Famous quotes containing the word usage:

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