Motto

A motto (Italian for pledge, sentence; plural: mottoes (always listed first) or also mottos) is a phrase meant to formally summarize the general motivation or intention of a social group or organization. A motto may be in any language, but Latin is the most used in the Western world. The local language is usual in the mottoes of governments. In informal ways, it can be a rule or slogan someone follows, or lives their life by.

Read more about Motto:  Heraldry, Literature

Famous quotes containing the word motto:

    I always say, my motto is “Art for my sake.” If I want to write, I write—and if I don’t want to, I won’t. The difficulty is to find exactly the form one’s passion—work is produced by passion with me ... Mwants to take.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    My friend devotes himself to his life, whenever he can find the spare time. His motto is: ‘Don’t just sit there: live!’ So he’s too busy to stand, to walk, to do anything, except to live. He even refused to kiss a girl, when invited, on the grounds that it was time again to be living. Schedules are sacred to him.
    Marvin Cohen, U.S. author and humorist. The Self-Devoted Friend, New Directions (1967)

    My motto is: “Lord I disbelieve—help thou my unbelief.”
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)