Mental Health in Singapore During The Colonial Period

Mental Health In Singapore During The Colonial Period

Mental health in Singapore has its roots in the West. The first medical personnel in the field were mostly from Britain. Medical education in the early years was almost exclusively for the British, until the establishment of King Edward VII College of Medicine on the island in 1907. Hence, many influential ideas flowed over from the West through the years.

Read more about Mental Health In Singapore During The Colonial Period:  The Colonial Years (1819–1942), The First Hospital For The Mentally Ill (1841–1928)

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