Members of The Victorian Legislative Council

The following are lists of members of the Victorian Legislative Council:

  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1851–1853
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1853–1856
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1856–1858
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1858–1860
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1860–1862
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1862–1864
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1864–1866
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1866–1868
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1868–1870
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1870–1872
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1872–1874
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1874–1876
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1876–1878
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1878–1880
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1880–1882
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1882–1884
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1884–1886
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1886–1888
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1888–1890
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1890–1892
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1892–1894
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1894–1895
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1895–1896
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1896–1898
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1898–1900
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1900–1901
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1901–1902
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1902–1904
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1904–1907
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1907–1910
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1910–1913
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1913–1916
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1916–1919
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1919–1922
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1922–1925
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1925–1928
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1928–1931
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1931–1934
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1934–1937
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1937–1940
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1940–1943
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1943–1946
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1946–1949
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1949–1952
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1952–1955
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1955–1958
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1958–1961
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1961–1964
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1964–1967
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1967–1970
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1970–1973
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1973–1976
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1976–1979
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1979–1982
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1982–1985
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1985–1988
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1988–1992
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1992–1996
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1996–1999
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 1999–2002
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 2002–2006
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 2006–2010
  • Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 2010–2014 (current parliament)

Famous quotes containing the words members of the, members of, members, victorian, legislative and/or council:

    It took six weeks of debate in the Senate to get the Arms Embargo Law repealed—and we face other delays during the present session because most of the Members of the Congress are thinking in terms of next Autumn’s election. However, that is one of the prices that we who live in democracies have to pay. It is, however, worth paying, if all of us can avoid the type of government under which the unfortunate population of Germany and Russia must exist.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    I rejoice that horses and steers have to be broken before they can be made the slaves of men, and that men themselves have some wild oats still left to sow before they become submissive members of society. Undoubtedly, all men are not equally fit subjects for civilization; and because the majority, like dogs and sheep, are tame by inherited disposition, this is no reason why the others should have their natures broken that they may be reduced to the same level.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Safe in their Alabaster Chambers—
    Untouched by Morning
    And untouched by Noon—
    Sleep the meek members of the Resurrection—
    Emily Dickinson (1830–1886)

    I belong to the fag-end of Victorian liberalism, and can look back to an age whose challenges were moderate in their tone, and the cloud on whose horizon was no bigger than a man’s hand.
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)

    I find it profoundly symbolic that I am appearing before a committee of fifteen men who will report to a legislative body of one hundred men because of a decision handed down by a court comprised of nine men—on an issue that affects millions of women.... I have the feeling that if men could get pregnant, we wouldn’t be struggling for this legislation. If men could get pregnant, maternity benefits would be as sacrosanct as the G.I. Bill.
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    I haven’t seen so much tippy-toeing around since the last time I went to the ballet. When members of the arts community were asked this week about one of their biggest benefactors, Philip Morris, and its requests that they lobby the New York City Council on the company’s behalf, the pas de deux of self- justification was so painstakingly choreographed that it constituted a performance all by itself.
    Anna Quindlen (b. 1952)