Martial

Marcus Valerius Martialis (known in English as Martial) (March 1, 40 AD – between 102 and 104 AD), was a Latin poet from Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva and Trajan. In these short, witty poems he cheerfully satirises city life and the scandalous activities of his acquaintances, and romanticises his provincial upbringing. He wrote a total of 1,561, of which 1,235 are in elegiac couplets. He is considered to be the creator of the modern epigram.

Read more about Martial:  Early Life, Life in Rome, Martial and His Patrons, Martial's Character, Martial's Epigrams, Reception

Famous quotes containing the word martial:

    Lie lightly on her, turf and dew:
    She put so little weight on you.
    —Marcus Valerius Martial (c. 40–104)

    What, then, does a chaste girl do?
    She does not offer, yet she does not say “No.”
    —Marcus Valerius Martial (c. 40–104)

    To a surprising extent the war-lords in shining armour, the apostles of the martial virtues, tend not to die fighting when the time comes. History is full of ignominious getaways by the great and famous.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)