Marist - Sporting Clubs

Sporting Clubs

In New Zealand and the South Pacific Marist Brothers of the Schools began football clubs that bear the name Marist. Over time these clubs have merged with other clubs and have become sporting clubs that now include other sports.

  • Marist F.C, a football club in the Solomon Islands
  • Marist St. Joseph, a club in Samoa
  • Marista Rugby Club, a rugby union club in Argentina
  • Gisborne Marist, a club in Gisborne, New Zealand
  • Wellington Marist, a club in Wellington, New Zealand
  • Palmerston North Marist, a club in Palmerston North, New Zealand
  • Marist Saints, a club in Auckland, New Zealand
  • Whangarei Marist, a club in Whangarei, New Zealand
  • Marist Brothers Old Boys in Auckland, New Zealand
  • Marist North Harbour Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Ardmore Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Hamilton Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Te Awamutu Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Greerton Marist Recreation and Community Sports Club, New Zealand
  • Whakatane Marist Rugby and Sports Club, New Zealand
  • Marist St Michaels Rugby and Sports Club, Rotorua, New Zealand
  • Napier Old Boys Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Marist Rugby Football Club, Whanganui, New Zealand
  • Masterton Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Hutt Old Boys Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Nelson Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Greymouth Marist Rugby Football Club, New Zealand
  • Marist Albion Rugby Football Club, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Athletic Marist Rugby Football Club, Oamaru, New Zealand
  • Marist Rugby Football Club, Invercargill, New Zealand
  • Fiji Marist Old Boys, Suva, Fiji
  • Wanganui Marist Football Club, New Zealand

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Famous quotes containing the words sporting and/or clubs:

    I once heard of a murderer who propped his two victims up against a chess board in sporting attitudes and was able to get as far as Seattle before his crime was discovered.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    Neighboring farmers and visitors at White Sulphur drove out occasionally to watch ‘those funny Scotchmen’ with amused superiority; when one member imported clubs from Scotland, they were held for three weeks by customs officials who could not believe that any game could be played with ‘such elongated blackjacks or implements of murder.’
    —For the State of West Virginia, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)