Manila Metropolitan Theater

The Manila Metropolitan Theater or MET is an Art Deco building in Manila, designed by the Filipino architect Juan M. Arellano. It was inaugurated on December 10, 1931, with a capacity of 1670 (846 orchestra, 116 in loge, and 708 in balcony). During the liberation of Manila by the United States and Filipino forces in 1945, the theatre was severely damaged, losing some of its roofing and destroying some of the walls. After reconstruction by the Americans it gradually fell into disuse in the 1960s. In the following decade it was meticulously restored in 1978 but again fell into decay.

Recently, a bus terminal and parking structure has been constructed at the back of the theatre.

The city of Manila, with the help of the National Commission on Culture and the Arts (NCCA) recently finished a plan to rehabilitate the theater.

The sculptures in the fa├žade of the theater are from the Italian sculptor Francesco Riccardo Monti, who lived in Manila from 1930 until his death in 1958, and worked closely together with Juan M. Arellano. Highly stylized relief carving of Philippine plants executed by the artist Isabelo Tampingco decorate the lobby walls and interior surfaces of the building.

The theater was again closed in 1996 due to ownership disputes between the city administration and the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS). On June 23, 2010, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and Manila mayor Alfredo Lim re-opened the theater after extensive renovations.

The theater is located on Padre Burgos Avenue, near the Manila Central Post Office.

Read more about Manila Metropolitan Theater:  Gallery

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