Magic

Magic may refer to:

  • Magic (illusion), the art of appearing to perform supernatural feats using sleight of hand, escapology, or other methods
  • Magic (paranormal), the use of paranormal methods to manipulate natural forces, such as witchcraft
    • Ceremonial magic, a ritual system of esoteric spiritual development using occult techniques
    • Magick, a specific system of ritual magic deriving from the religious philosophy of Thelema
    • Magic and religion, which may involve the intercession of deities or other spirits, such as prayer
  • Magic (fantasy), fictional characters or objects with magical powers.
    • Magic in fiction, the treatment of magic in fictional works
    • Magic (Middle-earth), the mystical, paranormal, or supernatural activity, appear in various forms in J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional realm of Middle-earth.
  • Magic (gaming), the portrayal of magic in roleplaying games
    • Magic of Dungeons & Dragons, widely used in the role-playing community, across many different fictional worlds, and across books, board games, video games, and movies.

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Famous quotes containing the word magic:

    You never see animals going through the absurd and often horrible fooleries of magic and religion.... Dogs do not ritually urinate in the hope of persuading heaven to do the same and send down rain. Asses do not bray a liturgy to cloudless skies. Nor do cats attempt, by abstinence from cat’s meat, to wheedle the feline spirits into benevolence. Only man behaves with such gratuitous folly. It is the price he has to pay for being intelligent but not, as yet, quite intelligent enough.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    The middle years of parenthood are characterized by ambiguity. Our kids are no longer helpless, but neither are they independent. We are still active parents but we have more time now to concentrate on our personal needs. Our children’s world has expanded. It is not enclosed within a kind of magic dotted line drawn by us. Although we are still the most important adults in their lives, we are no longer the only significant adults.
    —Ruth Davidson Bell. Ourselves and Our Children, by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, ch. 3 (1978)

    And thus they sang their mysterious duo, sang of their nameless hope, their death-in-love, their union unending, lost forever in the embrace of night’s magic kingdom. O sweet night, everlasting night of love! Land of blessedness whose frontiers are infinite!
    Thomas Mann (1875–1955)