List of Rare Species in The British National Vegetation Classification

List Of Rare Species In The British National Vegetation Classification

The following is a list of vascular plants, bryophytes and lichens which were regarded as rare species by the authors of British Plant Communities, together with the communities in which they occur.

This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

Read more about List Of Rare Species In The British National Vegetation Classification:  Vascular Plants, Lichens

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