List of Newspapers in The United States

This list of newspapers in the United States is a list of newspapers printed and distributed in the United States. It includes a list of the 25 newspapers in the United States with the most circulation, followed by lists of newspapers published in United States territory. Those lists are followed by a series of links to other lists of U.S. newspapers, organized by various categories.

As of 23 May 2008 (2008 -05-23), the United States had 1,422 daily newspapers and 6,253 weeklies.

Read more about List Of Newspapers In The United States:  Top 25 By Circulation, Longest Running, Other Lists of U.S. Newspapers

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