List of New Testament Church Fathers

The following list of New Testament Church Fathers provides an overview of an important part of the secondary source evidence for the text of the New Testament (NT). The NT was quoted by early Christian authors, like Ignatius of Antioch, called the Church Fathers, and also in anonymous works like the Didache. Some anonymous works have traditionally been misattributed to better-known authors, and are now known by the name of that author, but with the prefix pseudo (meaning "false" in Greek), for example Pseudo-Dionysius. The other most substantial component of secondary sources for the text of the NT is its early translations into other languages, like Latin. Translations of the NT are known as versions.

Read more about List Of New Testament Church Fathers:  History, Fathers, Misattributed Writings, Anonymous Works, See Also

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