List of Historical Sites Related To The Illinois Labor Movement

The following are historic points of labor history in the state of Illinois:

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    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)

    All is possible,
    Who so list believe;
    Trust therefore first, and after preve,
    As men wed ladies by license and leave,
    All is possible.
    Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503?–1542)

    Some of us still get all weepy when we think about the Gaia Hypothesis, the idea that earth is a big furry goddess-creature who resembles everybody’s mom in that she knows what’s best for us. But if you look at the historical record—Krakatoa, Mt. Vesuvius, Hurricane Charley, poison ivy, and so forth down the ages—you have to ask yourself: Whose side is she on, anyway?
    Barbara Ehrenreich (b. 1941)

    There is nothing but is related to us, nothing that does not interest us,—kingdom, college, tree, horse, or iron show,—the roots of all things are in man.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    An Illinois woman has invented a portable house which can be carried about in a cart or expressed to the seashore. It has also folding furniture and a complete camping outfit.
    Lydia Hoyt Farmer (1842–1903)

    His Labor is a Chant—
    His Idleness—a Tune—
    Oh, for a Bee’s experience
    Of Clovers, and of Noon!
    Emily Dickinson (1830–1886)

    The preservation of life seems to be rather a slogan than a genuine goal of the anti-abortion forces; what they want is control. Control over behavior: power over women. Women in the anti-choice movement want to share in male power over women, and do so by denying their own womanhood, their own rights and responsibilities.
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929)