Liquid Crystal Display - Military Use of LCD Monitors

Military Use of LCD Monitors

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LCD monitors have been adopted by the United States military, instead of CRT displays, because they are smaller, lighter and more efficient, although monochrome plasma displays are also used, notably for the M1 Abrams tank. For use with night vision imaging systems a U.S. military LCD monitor must be compliant with MIL-STD-3009 (formerly MIL-L-85762A). These LCD monitors go through extensive certification so that they pass the standards for the military. These include MIL-S-901D – High Shock (Sea Vessels), MIL-STD-167B – Vibration (Sea Vessels), MIL-STD-810F – Field Environmental Conditions (Ground Vehicles and Systems), MIL-STD 461E/F – EMI/RFI (Electromagnetic Interference/Radio Frequency Interference), MIL-STD-740B – Airborne/Structureborne Noise, and TEMPEST – Telecommunications Electronics Material Protected from Emanating Spurious Transmissions.

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