Legislative Council of Hong Kong - The Legislative Council Building

The Legislative Council Building

The Legislative Council of Hong Kong was housed in the Old Supreme Court building in Central Hong Kong from 1985 to November 2011. Beginning in December 2011, the Legco convenes at the Legislative Block of the Central Government Complex, Tamar.

The statue on the Legislative Council Building is a replica of the one erected on the Old Bailey of London – a depiction of the goddess of justice, Themis, and a legacy from the former Supreme Court.

Unlike many other former and current Commonwealth legislatures, the Hong Kong Legislative Council does not have a ceremonial mace placed in its chambers. However, the high courts of Hong Kong use a mace to open sessions, and it represents the authority and powers of the court.

To provide a long-term solution to the space shortage problem facing both the Government and the Legislative Council, the Government commissioned the Tamar Development for the design and construction of the Central Government Complex, the Legislative Council Complex and other ancillary facilities in 2008. The Legislative Council Complex comprises a low block and a high block: the low block, which will be named the Council Block, mainly houses conference facilities including the Chamber, major conference rooms, and communal facilities such as library, cafeteria and education facilities. The range of education facilities for visit by the public includes video corner, visitors' sharing area, exhibition area, children's corner, viewing gallery and access corridors, memory lane, education activities rooms and education galleries. The high block, which will be named as the Office Block, mainly houses offices for members and staff of the Legislative Council Secretariat. Officially opened on 1 August 2011, administrative staff had already taken occupation from 15 January 2011.

Read more about this topic:  Legislative Council Of Hong Kong

Famous quotes containing the words legislative, council and/or building:

    Freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power vested in it; a liberty to follow my own will in all things, when the rule prescribes not, and not to be subject to the inconstant, unknown, arbitrary will of another man.
    John Locke (1632–1704)

    There by some wrinkled stones round a leafless tree
    With beards askew, their eyes dull and wild
    Twelve ragged men, the council of charity
    Wandering the face of the earth a fatherless child....
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    We have our little theory on all human and divine things. Poetry, the workings of genius itself, which, in all times, with one or another meaning, has been called Inspiration, and held to be mysterious and inscrutable, is no longer without its scientific exposition. The building of the lofty rhyme is like any other masonry or bricklaying: we have theories of its rise, height, decline and fall—which latter, it would seem, is now near, among all people.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881)