Kulas - Plot

Plot

Long ago while the world was being created, the world of the immortals was also being formed by the almighty Bathala. Enchanted creatures had the responsibility of looking after nature and its inhabitants (humans). The world of the Engkantos was soon divided into two distinct groups –the benevolent Kabanuas and the evil Kasamayans. The two factions engaged in years of bitter war. Apo Suga, the leader of the Kabanua, asked the Sun God to bring peace to the world of the Engkantos. The Sun God granted Suga’s wish and told him that one of his daughters would bear a child, a "Dyosa"’ or goddess that would have the strength to bring peace and unite the Kabanuas and Kasamayans.

Amang Suga then had the task of deciding which of his two daughters – Mariang Sinukuan or Mariang Magayon -would conceive the chosen one in her womb. The Sun God told him that the one with a pure heart would bear the Dyosa of Nature. Amang Suga put his two daughters to the test to determine which of them would give birth to Dyosa. He was satisfied with Sinukuan’s reply and crowned her princess and heir to the Kabanua throne. Amang Suga then arranged for Mariang Sinukuan to be married to Tadaklan, the leader of the Kasamayans, with the hope of achieving peace in their world. Amang Suga, however, had no knowledge that Sinukuan was in love with Bernardo Carpio, a Kabanua warrior.

On the day of her wedding, Sinukuan was still undecided whether to follow her duty as the chosen one or follow her heart. Bernardo Carpio came to convince her to elope with him. Mariang Sinukuan made up her mind, followed her heart and went on to escape with Bernardo Carpio, accompanied by Huling and Miong. As they crossed treacherous roads and in the middle of their journey, Sinukuan revealed that she was carrying Bernardo's child. Apo Suga, Tadaklan and Magayon caught up with Sinukuan and Bernardo Carpio at the passageway to the world of mortals. Tadaklan, enraged by Sinukuan’s treachery, turned Bernardo Carpio into a statue of stone, while Sinukuan’s two companions were transformed into dwarves and Bakos was turned into an ugly goat creature. Mariang Sinukuan was not able to escape the fury of her sister Magayon who turned her into a unicorn. Mariang Magayon revealed that she was also in love with Bernardo and also pregnant with his child. The Kasamyans almost immediately returned to their previous ugly appearance after the wedding was called-off.

After the disappearance of her sister and due to Apo Suga’s failing health, Mariang Magayon took over the Kabanua throne. The Lakans reluctantly accepted her leadership but still considered Sinukuan the rightful heir to the throne. Magayon made pact with Tadaklan to arrange a marriage between Magayon’s daughter and his son.

Meanwhile, Sinukuan, along with Huling and Miong, was transported into the world of humans, with the help of Bakos’ magical flute. The trio landed in a circus where Huling and Miong were forced to work as dancing midgets. The greedy owner of the circus noticed that the unicorn (Sinukuan) could fetch her more money, so she decided to make it into a dancing unicorn and forced it to perform a dance in front of the crowd. The unicorn later gave birth to a beautiful, human baby girl. The child quickly manifests the traits of being a Dyosa, transforming from a human, into a centaur, a mermaid and then a half-woman half-eagle creature.

Read more about this topic:  Kulas

Famous quotes containing the word plot:

    The plot was most interesting. It belonged to no particular age, people, or country, and was perhaps the more delightful on that account, as nobody’s previous information could afford the remotest glimmering of what would ever come of it.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    Morality for the novelist is expressed not so much in the choice of subject matter as in the plot of the narrative, which is perhaps why in our morally bewildered time novelists have often been timid about plot.
    Jane Rule (b. 1931)

    “The plot thickens,” he said, as I entered.
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930)