Karl Barth

Karl Barth (/bɑːrt/; ; (1886-05-10)May 10, 1886 – December 10, 1968(1968-12-10)) was a Swiss Reformed theologian. Pope Pius XII described him as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. Barth's influence expanded well beyond the academic realm to mainstream culture, leading him to be featured on the cover of Time on April 20, 1962.

Beginning with his experience as a pastor, he rejected his training in the predominant liberal theology typical of 19th-century European Protestantism. Instead he embarked on a new theological path initially called dialectical theology, due to its stress on the paradoxical nature of divine truth (e.g., God's relationship to humanity embodies both grace and judgment). Other critics have referred to Barth as the father of neo-orthodoxy — a term emphatically rejected by Barth himself. The most accurate description of his work might be "a theology of the Word." Barth's theological thought emphasized the sovereignty of God, particularly through his interpretation of the Calvinistic doctrine of election. His most famous works are his The Epistle to the Romans, which marked a clear break from his earlier thinking; and his massive thirteen-volume work Church Dogmatics, one of the largest works of systematic theology ever written.

Read more about Karl Barth:  Early Life and Education, The Epistle To The Romans, Barmen Declaration, Church Dogmatics, Later Life, Theology, Barth, Liberals and Fundamentalists, Influence On Christian Ethics, Relationship With Charlotte Von Kirschbaum, In Literature, Center For Barth Studies, Quotations

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