Kansas City International Airport

Kansas City International Airport (IATA: MCI, ICAO: KMCI, FAA LID: MCI), originally named Mid-Continent International Airport, is an American public airport located 15 miles (24 km) northwest of the central business district of Kansas City, in Platte County, Missouri, United States. In 2008, 10,469,892 passengers used the airport.

It has consistently ranked in the top-five airports in the North America Airport Satisfaction Study by J. D. Power and Associates. In February 2010, the airport was the highest-rated medium-sized airport receiving five stars in all categories. In February 2008, U.S. News & World Report ranked the airport the "third least miserable airport" in the U.S., based on the 47 busiest airports in the country.

Its largest carriers are Southwest Airlines and Delta Air Lines, which both operate a large number of daily flights in Terminal B.

The airport has always been a civilian airport and has never had an Air National Guard unit assigned to it, unlike many major comparably sized airports.

In 2009, the airport was reported as having the highest number of wildlife strikes of any airport in the US, based on take-offs and landings (57 per 100,000). FAA records showed 146 strikes in 2008 – up from 37 in 2000.

Read more about Kansas City International Airport:  Facilities and Aircraft, Proposed Central Terminal, MCI Instead of KCI, Hubs, Transportation To and From The Airport, Rental Cars, Incidents, Airlines and Destinations, Popular Culture

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