Japanese Traditional Dolls

Japanese traditional dolls are known by the name ningyō (人形?) in Japan, which literally means human shape.

There are various types of Japanese dolls, some representing children and babies, some the imperial court, warriors and heroes, fairy-tale characters, gods and (rarely) demons, and also people of the daily life of Japanese cities. Many have a long tradition and are still made today, for household shrines, for formal gift-giving, or for festival celebrations such as Hinamatsuri, the doll festival, or Kodomo no Hi, Children's Day. Some are manufactured as a local craft, to be purchased by pilgrims as a souvenir of a temple visit or some other trip.

Read more about Japanese Traditional Dolls:  Early History, The Edo Period, Modern Era

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