Jackson Mc Donald

Jackson C. McDonald is United States diplomat and a career officer of the U.S. Foreign Service. He served as the Ambassador to Guinea 2004–2007. From 2001 to 2004, he served as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of The Gambia.

Ambassador McDonald studied at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, the Institut d'études politiques in Paris (best known as Sciences Po), and the École nationale d'administration in Paris. He began his career in the U.S. Foreign Service in 1980 as Third Secretary and Vice Consul at the American Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh. From 1982 to 1984, he served as Country Officer for Bangladesh at the U.S. Department of State. In 1984, he volunteered for duty at the American Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, where he served as Second Secretary for Political Affairs for two years.

After a year of Russian-language training, Ambassador McDonald served as First Secretary for Political Affairs at the American Embassy in Moscow, the Soviet Union, from 1990 to 1991. In early 1992, he volunteered to open the American Embassy in Almaty, Kazakhstan, where he served first as Chargé d'Affaires then as Deputy Chief of Mission until 1994. From 1994 to 1997, Mr. McDonald served as Consul General in Marseille, France, with dual accreditation to the Principality of Monaco.

After graduating from the U.S. Department of State's Senior Seminar in 1998, he was assigned as Deputy Chief of Mission at the American Embassy in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. In October 2001, he was sworn in as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of The Gambia, a post he held until May 2004 before being appointed to his present ambassadorial post in Guinea. Ambassador McDonald speaks French and Russian. He has received the U.S. Department of State's Superior Honor Award six times. He is Officer (honorary) in the National Order of the Republic of The Gambia.

Ambassador McDonald was born in Florida. He is married and has three children.

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    The great constitutional corrective in the hands of the people against usurpation of power, or corruption by their agents is the right of suffrage; and this when used with calmness and deliberation will prove strong enough.
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