International Journal of Quantum Chemistry

The International Journal of Quantum Chemistry is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing original, primary research and review articles on all aspects of quantum chemistry, including an expanded scope focusing on aspects of materials science, biochemistry, biophysics, quantum physics, quantum information theory, etc. The 2010 impact factor of the journal is 1.302.

It was established in 1967 by Per-Olov Löwdin. In 2011, the journal moved to an in-house editorial office model, in which a permanent team of full-time, professional editors is responsible for article scrutiny and editorial content.

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