IAE Jean Moulin University Lyon 3

IAE Jean Moulin University Lyon 3

The IAE, standing for Institut d'Administration des Entreprises (Institute of Business Administration), is the school of business of the Jean Moulin University Lyon3. Also known as the IAE of Lyon, its main campus is located in the historical complex of the “Manufacture des Tabacs” in the heart of Lyon, France.

Founded in 1956 the IAE of Lyon has 6300 students in 2007 (including 2000 in postgraduate studies), accounting for more than 28% of the 22,300 students at Lyon 3 University.

In addition to the 144 full time professors at the IAE, 400 executives from private, external companies contribute to the education.

The various courses offered in 2008 include four Bachelor degrees (Licence), eight professional Bachelor degrees (Licence professionnelles), nine Masters degrees (with 40 specializations) and preparatory courses for the chartered accountants examination.

The IAE of Lyon is one of the top French universities for research and training in management. The school is highly internationalized and has an alumni network of 30,000 former students throughout the world.

Read more about IAE Jean Moulin University Lyon 3:  History, Campuses, International Dimension

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