HP TRIM Records Management System

HP TRIM Records Management System

HP TRIM is an electronic document and records management system (EDRMS) marketed by the HP Software Division and based on technology from Hewlett-Packard's 2008 acquisition of TOWER Software. HP TRIM is an enterprise document and records management system for physical and electronic information designed to help businesses capture, manage, and secure business information in order to meet governance and regulatory compliance obligations. Nevertheless, employees may also find it useful in terms of their own productivity.

Other vendors in document and records management include Autonomy, EMC Corporation, IBM, Open Text, Oracle Corporation, Microsoft, and Alfresco.

Read more about HP TRIM Records Management System:  Functionality, Standards Compliance

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