History of Personal Computers

History Of Personal Computers

The history of personal computer as mass-market consumer electronic devices effectively began in 1977 with the introduction of microcomputers, although some mainframe and mincomputers had been applied as single-user systems much earlier. A personal computer is one intended for interactive individual use, as opposed to a mainframe computer where the end user's requests are filtered through operating staff, or a time sharing system in which one large processor is shared by many individuals. After the development of the microprocessor, individual personal computers were low enough in cost that they eventually became affordable consumer goods. Early personal computers – generally called microcomputers – were sold often in electronic kit form and in limited numbers, and were of interest mostly to hobbyists and technicians.

Read more about History Of Personal Computers:  Etymology, 1977 and The Emergence of The "Trinity", Home Computers, The IBM PC, Apple Lisa and Macintosh, PC Clones Dominate, Market

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