Great Wyrley - The 'Great Wyrley Outrages' - in Popular Culture

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The case is related in Conan Doyle's The Story of Mr. George Edalji (1907, expanded re-issue in 1985).

The episode of the 1972 BBC anthology series The Edwardians about Conan Doyle centres on his involvement in the Edaji case. Written by Jeremy Paul and directed by Brian Farnham, it stars Nigel Davenport as Conan Doyle, Sam Dastor as George Edaji, and Renu Setna as the Reverend Edaji.

The case was fictionalised in the novel by Julian Barnes, Arthur & George (2005), which was nominated for the 2005 Man Booker Prize. In 2010, Arthur & George was adapted for the theatre by David Edgar, with the play focusing heavily on the trial of George Edalji and The Great Wyrley Outrages.

A comprehensive non-fictional account of the case was published in 2006 in Conan Doyle and the Parson's Son: The George Edalji Case' written by Gordon Weaver.

In Roger Oldfield's book 'Outrage: The Edalji Five and the Shadow of Sherlock Holmes', Vanguard Press (2010), www.outrage-rogeroldfield.co.uk, the famous case is set within the context of the wider experiences of the Edalji family as a whole. Roger Oldfield once taught history at Great Wyrley High School.

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