Garrett Fort

Garrett Fort

Garrett Elsden Fort (June 5, 1900 - October 26, 1945) was an American short story writer, playwright, and Hollywood screenwriter. He was also a close follower of Meher Baba.

Fort made his screenwriting debut with the silent film, One of the Finest (1917). Early in his career, Fort co-wrote the Broadway play Jarnegan (1928), based on the novel by Jim Tully. Fort's first talkie effort was the ground-breaking Rouben Mamoulian production Applause (1929). In 2006 Applause was recognized as a culturally, historically and aesthetically significant film by the National Film Registry.

Fort was adept at alternating horrific highlights with bits of unexpected humor. As a screenwriter he is best remembered for his work on the original screen adaptations of such horror/melodramas as Frankenstein (1931), Dracula (1931), Dracula's Daughter (1936), and The Mark of Zorro (1940).

Read more about Garrett Fort:  Spiritual Life and Demise, Selected Filmography

Famous quotes by garrett fort:

    The Abbey always reminds me of that old toast, ‘Above lofty timbers, the walls around are bare, echoing to our laughter, as though the dead were there.’
    Garrett Fort (1900–1945)

    My mind is just as open as it ever was, professor. But it’s a scientific mind, and there’s no place in it for superstitions.
    Garrett Fort (1900–1945)

    Have you never wanted to do anything that was dangerous? Where should we be if nobody tried to find out what lies beyond? You never wanted to look beyond the clouds and the stars, or to know what causes the trees to bud, and what changes a darkness into light? But if you talk like that, people call you crazy. Well, if I could discover just one of these things—what eternity is, for example—I wouldn’t care if they did think I was crazy.
    Garrett Fort (1900–1945)

    You can’t murder a man who’s been dead for five centuries.
    Garrett Fort (1900–1945)

    Possibly there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in your psychiatry, Mr. Garth.
    Garrett Fort (1900–1945)