Fruit

In botany, a fruit is a part of a flowering plant that derives from specific tissues of the flower, one or more ovaries, and in some cases accessory tissues. Fruits are the means by which these plants disseminate seeds. Many of them that bear edible fruits, in particular, have propagated with the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship as a means for seed dispersal and nutrition, respectively; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.

The section of a fungus that produces spores is also called a fruiting body. In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet and edible in the raw state, such as apples, oranges, grapes, strawberries, and bananas. On the other hand, the botanical sense of "fruit" includes many structures that are not commonly called "fruits", such as bean pods, corn kernels, wheat grains, and tomatoes.

Read more about Fruit:  Botanic Fruit and Culinary Fruit, Fruit Development, Seedless Fruits, Seed Dissemination, Uses, Safety, Storage

Famous quotes containing the word fruit:

    The natural historian is not a fisherman who prays for cloudy days and good luck merely; but as fishing has been styled “a contemplative man’s recreation,” introducing him profitably to woods and water, so the fruit of the naturalist’s observations is not in new genera or species, but in new contemplations still, and science is only a more contemplative man’s recreation.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    As a tree my sin stands
    To darken all lands;
    Death is the fruit it bore.
    Christina Georgina Rossetti (1830–1894)

    ‘Tis no sin love’s fruit to steal;
    But the sweet theft to reveal,
    To be taken, to be seen,
    These have crimes accounted been.
    Ben Jonson (1572–1637)