Free Improvisation

Free improvisation or free music is improvised music without any rules beyond the logic or inclination of the musician(s) involved. The term can refer to both a technique (employed by any musician in any genre) and as a recognizable genre in its own right.

Free improvisation, as a genre of music, developed in the U.S. and Europe in the mid to late 1960s, largely as an outgrowth of free jazz and modern classical musics. None of its primary exponents can be said to be famous amongst the general public; however, in experimental circles, a number of free musicians are well known, including saxophonists Evan Parker, Anthony Braxton and Peter Brötzmann, trombonist George Lewis, guitarist Derek Bailey, and the improvising groups The Art Ensemble of Chicago and AMM.

Read more about Free Improvisation:  Characteristics, History, Free Improvisation On The Radio

Famous quotes containing the word free:

    Language is a process of free creation; its laws and principles are fixed, but the manner in which the principles of generation are used is free and infinitely varied. Even the interpretation and use of words involves a process of free creation.
    Noam Chomsky (b. 1928)