Ford Explorer

The Ford Explorer is a sport-utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990, as a replacement for the smaller but related Ford Bronco II. It is manufactured in Chicago, Illinois (it was also assembled in Hazelwood, Missouri until the plant closed on March 10, 2006). The Ford Explorer was instrumental in turning the SUV from a special-interest vehicle into one of the most popular vehicle types on the road. Model years through 2010 were traditional mid-sized SUVs, with the redesign for the 2011 model year classifying it as a full-sized crossover SUV. It is slotted between the larger Ford Expedition and the smaller Ford Escape. Although outwardly similar, the fifth generation Explorer and Ford Edge do not share platforms nor range in the Ford lineup.

The Explorer has also been involved in controversy, after a spate of fatal rollover accidents in the 1990s involving Explorers fitted with Firestone tires. Both two-door Explorer Sport and four-door models of Explorer have been sold. Part-time four-wheel drive is an available option, and since 1995 this has been a 'shift on the fly' system with full protection against being engaged at high speed. A specially modified Special Service Vehicle version is also available from Ford Fleet for law enforcement agencies, fire departments, and EMS agencies. Explorer was also the name of a trim package offered on the Ford F-Series trucks from 1968 to 1986. The 2011 Ford Explorer was named North American Truck of the Year.

Read more about Ford Explorer:  First Generation (1991–1994), Second Generation (1995–2001), Third Generation (2002–2005), Fourth Generation (2006–2010), Fifth Generation (2011–), Explorer Sport Variation, Special Service Vehicle, Sales

Famous quotes containing the words ford and/or explorer:

    Charging a man with murder in this place was like handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500.
    John Milius, U.S. screenwriter, Francis Ford Coppola (b. 1939)

    Treading the soil of the moon, palpating its pebbles, tasting the panic and splendor of the event, feeling in the pit of one’s stomach the separation from terra ... these form the most romantic sensation an explorer has ever known ... this is the only thing I can say about the matter. The utilitarian results do not interest me.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)