Extraordinary Chambers in The Courts of Cambodia

The Khmer Rouge Tribunal (officially known as the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia) is a court established to try the most senior and most responsible members of the Khmer Rouge. Although it is a national court, it was established as part of an agreement between the Royal Government of Cambodia and the United Nations, and its members include both local and foreign judges. It is considered as a hybrid court; as the ECCC was created by the government in conjunction with the UN, but remains independent of them, with trials held in Cambodia using Cambodian staff under mandate. Nevertheless, the Cambodian court invites international participation in order to apply international standards.

The remit of the Extraordinary Chambers extends to serious violations of Cambodian penal law, international humanitarian law and custom, and violation of international conventions recognized by Cambodia, committed during the period between 17 April 1975 and 6 January 1979. This includes crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide. The chief purpose of the tribunal as identified by the Extraordinary Chambers is to provide justice to the Cambodian people who were victims of the Khmer Rouge regime's policies between April 1975 and January 1979. However, rehabilitative victim support and media outreach for the purpose of national education are also outlined as primary goals of the commission.

Read more about Extraordinary Chambers In The Courts Of Cambodia:  Origin, Judicial Chambers, Organs of The ECCC, Jurisdiction and Applicable Law, Domestic Response, Criticisms

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