Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel

Eliezer "Elie" Wiesel KBE ( /ˈɛli vɨˈzɛl/; Hungarian: Wiesel Lázár; born September 30, 1928) is a Romanian-born Jewish-American writer, professor, political activist, Nobel Laureate, and Holocaust survivor. He is the author of 57 books, including Night, a work based on his experiences as a prisoner in the Auschwitz, Buna, and Buchenwald concentration camps. Wiesel is also the Advisory Board chairman of the newspaper Algemeiner Journal.

When Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986, the Norwegian Nobel Committee called him a "messenger to mankind," stating that through his struggle to come to terms with "his own personal experience of total humiliation and of the utter contempt for humanity shown in Hitler's death camps", as well as his "practical work in the cause of peace", Wiesel had delivered a powerful message "of peace, atonement and human dignity" to humanity.

Read more about Elie Wiesel:  Early Life, World War II, After The War, Life in The United States, Recent, Controversy Over Historical and Religious Rights To Jerusalem, Awards and Honors, Bibliography

Famous quotes by elie wiesel:

    I don’t believe in accidents. There are only encounters in history. There are no accidents.
    Elie Wiesel (b. 1928)

    I marvel at the resilience of the Jewish people. Their best characteristic is their desire to remember. No other people has such an obsession with memory.
    Elie Wiesel (b. 1928)

    I rarely speak about God. To God, yes. I protest against Him. I shout at Him. But to open a discourse about the qualities of God, about the problems that God imposes, theodicy, no. And yet He is there, in silence, in filigree.
    Elie Wiesel (b. 1928)

    Man, as long as he lives, is immortal. One minute before his death he shall be immortal. But one minute later, God wins.
    Elie Wiesel (b. 1928)

    Because I remember, I despair. Because I remember, I have the duty to reject despair.
    Elie Wiesel (b. 1928)