Elena Delle Donne - Basketball Awards and Honors

Basketball Awards and Honors

Delle Donne at Springfield Hoophall Classic
  • McDonald's All-American Team 2008
  • USA Today National Player of the Year 2008
  • Naismith Prep Player of the Year 2008
  • Gatorade National Player of the Year 2008
  • EA SPORTS Player of the Year 2008
  • Third Team, All-America, Parade Magazine, 2007
  • Gatorade State Player of the Year, 2007
  • First-ever cover subject of GIRL magazine, 2007
  • Slam Magazine All-American First Team, 2006
  • Women's Basketball Magazine All-American First Team, 2006
  • Parade All American First Team, 2006
  • Sports Illustrated All-American Second Team, 2006
  • EA Sports All-American, 2006
  • USA Today All-American Third Team, 2006
  • Gatorade State Player of the Year, 2006
  • All-State First Team 2006
  • Scout/FCP SUPER SIX, 2005
  • Parade All-America Fourth Team, 2005
  • EA Sports All-America, 2005
  • Gatorade Delaware Player of the Year, 2005
  • DSBA Delaware Player of the Year, 2005
  • Street & Smith All-American Third Team, 2005
  • All-State First Team 2005
  • USA Today Freshman All-America, 2004
  • Nike All-America Camp, 2004
  • Honorable Mention, Street & Smith Preseason All-America, 2004
  • All-State First Team 2004
  • USA Today First Team All-America 2008

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