Electric Bicycle

An electric bicycle, also known as an e-bike, is a bicycle with an electric motor used to power the vehicle. Electric bicycles use rechargeable batteries and can travel up to 15 to 20 mph (24 to 32 km/h), depending on the laws of the country in which they are sold. In some markets they are rapidly replacing traditional bikes and motorcycles.

In many parts of the world, electric bicycles are classified as bicycles rather than motor vehicles, so they are not subject to the more stringent laws regarding certification and operation of motor vehicles. Electric bicycles are one type of motorized bicycle. However, electric bicycles are defined separately and treated as a specific vehicle type in many areas of legal jurisdiction.

Electric bicycle usage worldwide has experienced rapid growth since 1998. It is estimated that there were roughly 120 million e-bikes in China as of early 2010, and sales are expanding rapidly in India, the United States of America, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. A total of 700,000 electric bicycles were sold in Europe in 2010, up from 200,000 in 2007 and 500,000 units in 2009.

Read more about Electric Bicycle:  History, Motors and Drivetrains, Batteries, Controllers, Design Variations, Health Benefits, Environmental Effects, Road Traffic Safety, Market Predictions

Famous quotes containing the words electric and/or bicycle:

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    Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    Consider a man riding a bicycle. Whoever he is, we can say three things about him. We know he got on the bicycle and started to move. We know that at some point he will stop and get off. Most important of all, we know that if at any point between the beginning and the end of his journey he stops moving and does not get off the bicycle he will fall off it. That is a metaphor for the journey through life of any living thing, and I think of any society of living things.
    William Golding (b. 1911)