Eisenhower National Historic Site

Eisenhower National Historic Site was the home and farm of General and President of the United States Dwight D. Eisenhower and Mamie Doud Eisenhower. Located adjacent to the Gettysburg Battlefield in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the farm served as a weekend retreat for the President and a meeting place for world leaders. It was the Eisenhowers' home after they left the White House in 1961. With its putting green, skeet range, and view of South Mountain, it offered President Eisenhower a much-needed respite from the pressures of Washington. It was also a successful cattle operation, with a show herd of black Angus cattle. Some of the more notable of Eisenhower's guests were Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, French President Charles de Gaulle, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and California Governor Ronald Reagan.

Read more about Eisenhower National Historic Site:  History, Grounds, Today

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