Eastern Tent Caterpillar

The eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum) is a univoltine, social species that forms communal nests in the branches of trees. It is sometimes confused with the gypsy moth, or the fall webworm, and may be erroneously referred to as a bagworm, which is the common name applied to unrelated caterpillars in the family Psychidae. The moths oviposit almost exclusively on trees in the plant family Rosaceae, particularly cherry (Prunus) and apple (Malus). The caterpillars are hairy with areas of blue, white, black and orange. The blue and white colors are structural colors created by the selective filtering of light by microtubules that arise on the cuticle.

Read more about Eastern Tent Caterpillar:  Social Species, Tents and Temperature, Feeding, Toxicity

Famous quotes containing the words eastern, tent and/or caterpillar:

    The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
    Checkering the eastern clouds with streaks of light.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    The sugar maple is remarkable for its clean ankle. The groves of these trees looked like vast forest sheds, their branches stopping short at a uniform height, four or five feet from the ground, like eaves, as if they had been trimmed by art, so that you could look under and through the whole grove with its leafy canopy, as under a tent whose curtain is raised.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    That author who draws a character, even though to common view incongruous in its parts, as the flying-squirrel, and, at different periods, as much at variance with itself as the caterpillar is with the butterfly into which it changes, may yet, in so doing, be not false but faithful to facts.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)