Desperate Housewives (season 4)

Desperate Housewives (season 4)

The fourth season of Desperate Housewives, an American television series created by Marc Cherry, premiered on September 30, 2007 on ABC. Filming for the series was interrupted by the 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America strike in November 2007, after production on the two-episode tornado storyline wrapped. The first part, "Something's Coming", aired on December 2, 2007. "Welcome to Kanagawa", the second part and the last episode filmed before the strike, was originally going to be aired after the strike's resolution, but aired on January 6, 2008. Seven additional episodes were produced for the fourth season after the strike, the first of which aired on April 13, 2008. The final two episodes served as a two-part finale and were aired consecutively on May 18, 2008. A total of 17 episodes aired as part of the season, with one recap special airing on September 23, 2007.

The series continues to focus on Wisteria Lane residents Susan Delfino, Lynette Scavo, Bree Hodge and Gabrielle Solis, with Mary Alice Young returning as the series' narrator. Katherine Mayfair and her family are introduced in this season and are the center of the season's mystery. Critical reception for the season was positive, and ratings increased from the third season. The series drew in an average of 17.9 million viewers per episode during the 2007-08 American television season, becoming the sixth most-watched program of the year and the most-watched scripted program for the first time.

The series was released on a five-disc DVD box set by ABC Studios on September 2, 2008 in Region 1, October 29, 2008 in Region 4, November 3, 2008 in Region 2, and March 17, 2009 in Region 5.

Read more about Desperate Housewives (season 4):  Production, Cast, Episodes, Season Debuts

Famous quotes containing the words desperate and/or housewives:

    O mischief, thou art swift
    To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    By now, legions of tireless essayists and op-ed columnists have dressed feminists down for making such a fuss about entering the professions and earning equal pay that everyone’s attention has been distracted from the important contributions of mothers working at home. This judgment presumes, of course, that prior to the resurgence of feminism in the ‘70s, housewives and mothers enjoyed wide recognition and honor. This was not exactly the case.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)