Depth

Depth(s) may refer to:

  • Three-dimensional space
  • Depth (ring theory), an important invariant of rings and modules in commutative and homological algebra
  • Depth in a well, the measurement between two points in an oil well
  • Color depth (or "number of bits" or "bit depth") in computer graphics
  • Market depth, in financial markets, the size of an order needed to move the market a given amount
  • Moulded depth, a nautical measurement

In art and entertainment:

  • Depths (novel), a novel by Henning Mankell
  • Depths (album), an album by Oceano
  • "Depths" (Law & Order: Criminal Intent), an episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent
  • Depth, the Japanese title for the PlayStation game released in Europe under the name Fluid

Famous quotes containing the word depth:

    To whatsoever upright mind, to whatsoever beating heart I speak, to you it is committed to educate men. By simple living, by an illimitable soul, you inspire, you correct, you instruct, you raise, you embellish all. By your own act you teach the beholder how to do the practicable. According to the depth from which you draw your life, such is the depth not only of your strenuous effort, but of your manners and presence.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Love and work are viewed and experienced as totally separate activities motivated by separate needs. Yet, when we think about it, our common sense tells us that our most inspired, creative acts are deeply tied to our need to love and that, when we lack love, we find it difficult to work creatively; that work without love is dead, mechanical, sheer competence without vitality, that love without work grows boring, monotonous, lacks depth and passion.
    Marta Zahaykevich, Ucranian born-U.S. psychitrist. “Critical Perspectives on Adult Women’s Development,” (1980)

    It is thus that the few rare lucid well-disposed people who have had to struggle on the earth find themselves at certain hours of the day or night in the depth of certain authentic and waking nightmare states, surrounded by the formidable suction, the formidable tentacular oppression of a kind of civic magic which will soon be seen appearing openly in social behavior.
    Antonin Artaud (1896–1948)