Demographics of Europe - Religion

Religion

Over the last several decades, religious practice has been on the decline in a process of "Secularization." European countries have experienced a decline in church attendance, as well as a decline in the number of people professing a belief in a god. The Eurobarometer Poll 2005 found that, on average, 52% of the citizens of EU member states state that they believe in a god, 27% believe there is some sort of spirit or life Force while 18% do not believe there is any sort of spirit, god or Life Force, and 3% declined to answer. According to a recent study, 47% of Frenchmen declared themselves as agnostic in 2003. This situation is often called "Post-Christian Europe". Despite the declining numbers, Christianity remains the dominant religion in Europe, and a study by the Pew Research Center's found that 76.2% of the Europe population considering themselves Christians,

A decrease in religiousness and church attendance in western Europe (especially Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden) has been noted. The Eurobarometer poll must be taken with caution, however, as there are discrepancies between it and national census results. For example in the United Kingdom, the 2001 census revealed over 70% of the population regarded themselves as "Christian" with only 15% professing to have "no religion", though the wording of the question has been criticized as "leading" by the British Humanist Association.

Read more about this topic:  Demographics Of Europe

Famous quotes containing the word religion:

    This is one of the paradoxes of the democratic movement—that it loves a crowd and fears the individuals who compose it—that the religion of humanity should have no faith in human beings.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    To sum up:
    1. The cosmos is a gigantic fly-wheel making 10,000 revolutions a minute.
    2. Man is a sick fly taking a dizzy ride on it.
    3. Religion is the theory that the wheel was designed and set spinning to give him the ride.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)

    The cloister and the observatory saint
    Take comfort in about the same complaint.
    So science and religion really meet.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)