Degrees of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism

The degrees of Eastern Orthodox monasticism are the stages an Eastern Orthodox monk or nun passes through in their religious vocation.

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the process of becoming a monk or nun (female ascetics in the East are called monks, nun is a Western tradition) is intentionally slow, as the monastic vows taken are considered to entail a lifelong commitment to God, and are not to be entered into lightly. After completing the novitiate, there are three degrees of or steps in conferring the monastic habit.

Read more about Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism:  Orthodox Monasticism, Coptic Orthodox Monastic Degrees

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