Daryl Porter

Daryl Maurice Porter (born January 16, 1974 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida) is a former professional American football safety in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the Detroit Lions (1997), the Buffalo Bills (1998–2000), and the Tennessee Titans (2001).

Although predominantly known for his career as an athlete for the NFL and his dedication to local High School Athletics, D.P. recently eliminated an interesting threat to the City of Fort Lauderdale. Since February 2011, a giant Great White Shark has pestered the area immediately outside of the Port Everglades inlet. Daryl Porter, being an accomplished fisherman and diver, set out to capture or contain this beast. From March 2011 to July 2011 D.P. was a regular sight hunting this great White Shark from Barracuda Reef south of the inlet to the Shoals North of the inlet. On July 23, 2011 8:23 PM, D.P. declared "Fish On" to his boatmate, Oronde Gadsden. D.P. fought the fish for 2 hours until the shark sought refuge in the bottom of Barracuda Reef. At this point, D.P. donned his diving gear and proceeded to hunt the shark underwater. After 30 minutes of downtime, D.P. pushed the dead shark to the surface where Mr. Gadsden hauled it aboard. This was the end of the "Port Everglades Great White".

Pittsburgh Steelers 1997 NFL Draft selections
  • Chad Scott
  • Will Blackwell
  • Paul Wiggins
  • Mike Vrabel
  • George Jones
  • Daryl Porter
  • Rod Manuel
  • Mike Adams
Draft Years
1974
1976
1978
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012

Career

Persondata
Name Porter, Daryl
Alternative names
Short description American football player
Date of birth January 16, 1974
Place of birth Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Date of death
Place of death


Famous quotes containing the word porter:

    They had both noticed that a life of dissipation sometimes gave to a face the look of gaunt suffering spirituality that a life of asceticism was supposed to give and quite often did not.
    —Katherine Anne Porter (1890–1980)