Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (IATA: DFW, ICAO: KDFW, FAA LID: DFW) is located between the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas, and is the busiest airport in the U.S. state of Texas. It generally serves the Dallas–Fort Worth metropolitan area.

DFW is the fourth busiest airport in the world in terms of aircraft movements. In terms of passenger traffic, it is the eighth busiest airport in the world. It is the largest hub for American Airlines. DFW Airport is considered to be an Airport City.

In terms of land area, at 18,076 acres (7,315 ha), it is the largest airport in Texas, and the second largest in the United States, behind Denver International Airport. It is the tenth busiest international gateway in the United States, and second in Texas, following Houston Intercontinental.

DFW has its own post office ZIP code, and public services. The United States Postal Service gave the airport its own city designation, DFW Airport, TX. The members of the airport's Board of Directors are appointed by the "owner cities" of Dallas and Fort Worth. The airport is inside the city limits of four suburban cities, a situation that has led to legal battles over jurisdiction. To help ensure future harmony with its neighbors, the DFW Airport Board includes a non-voting member – a representative chosen from the airport's neighbors (Irving, Euless, Grapevine, and Coppell) on a rotating basis.

Read more about Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport:  History, Terminals, Airlines and Destinations, Cargo, Founders Plaza, Other Facilities

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