Crowds

Crowds is a proposed anonymity network that gives probable innocence in the face of a large number of attackers. Crowds was designed by Michael K. Reiter and Aviel D. Rubin and defends against internal attackers and a corrupt receiver, but provides no anonymity against a global attacker or a local eavesdropper (see "Crowds: Anonymity For Web Transactions"). Crowds is vulnerable to the predecessor attack; this was discussed in Reiter and Rubin's paper and further expanded in "The Predecessor Attack: An Analysis of a Threat to Anonymous Communications Systems" by Matthew K. Wright, Micah Adler, And Brian Neil Levine. Crowds introduced the concept of users blending into a crowd of computers. Provide users with a mechanism for anonymous Web browsing. The main idea behind Crowds anonymity protocol is to hide each user's communications by routing them randomly within a group of similar users. By Crowds protocol a corrupt group member or local eavesdropper that observes a message being sent by a particular user can never be sure whether the user is the actual sender, or is simply routing another user's message.

Read more about Crowds:  How Crowds Works, Definitions, Basic Design, Security Analysis, Scale, Attacks

Famous quotes containing the word crowds:

    Good-bye, proud world! I’m Going home;
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    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The long high tent of growing and making, wired-off
    Wood tables past which crowds shuffle, eyeing the scrubbed
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    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)

    Fine art is the subtlest, the most seductive, the most effective instrument of moral propaganda in the world, excepting only the example of personal conduct; and I waive even this exception in favor of the art of the stage, because it works by exhibiting examples of personal conduct made intelligible and moving to crowds of unobservant unreflecting people to whom real life means nothing.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)