Crowd

A crowd is a large and definable group of people, while "the crowd" is referred to as the so-called lower orders of people in general (the mob). A crowd may be definable through a common purpose or set of emotions, such as at a political rally, at a sports event, or during looting (this is known as a psychological crowd), or simply be made up of many people going about their business in a busy area (e.g. shopping). Everybody in the context of general public or the common people is normally referred to as the masses.

Read more about Crowd:  Terminology, Social Aspects of Crowds, Psychological Aspects of Crowds

Famous quotes containing the word crowd:

    He turns agen and drives the noisy crowd
    And beats the dogs in noises loud.
    He drives away and beats them every one,
    And then they loose them all and set them on.
    He falls as dead and kicked by boys and men,
    Then starts and grins and drives the crowd agen;
    Till kicked and torn and beaten out he lies
    And leaves his hold and cackles, groans, and dies.
    John Clare (1793–1864)

    The Humanity of men and women is inversely proportional to their Numbers. A Crowd is no more human than an Avalanche or a Whirlwind. A rabble of men and women stands lower in the scale of moral and intellectual being than a herd of Swine or of Jackals.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Most literature on the culture of adolescence focuses on peer pressure as a negative force. Warnings about the “wrong crowd” read like tornado alerts in parent manuals. . . . It is a relative term that means different things in different places. In Fort Wayne, for example, the wrong crowd meant hanging out with liberal Democrats. In Connecticut, it meant kids who weren’t planning to get a Ph.D. from Yale.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)