Cork Institute of Technology

Cork Institute of Technology (CIT), formerly the Regional Technical College, Cork, is an Institute of Technology in Ireland, located in Cork, Ireland opened in 1973. The institute has 17,000 students (both part-time and full-time) in art, business, engineering, music and science disciplines. The main campus is in Bishopstown, Cork.

Cork Institute of Technology comprises two constituent Faculties and three constituent Colleges. The constituent Faculties are Engineering and Science, and Business and Humanities. The constituent colleges are the CIT Crawford College of Art and Design, the CIT Cork School of Music and the National Maritime College of Ireland.

Faculties are made up of Schools which in turn comprise two or more academic departments.

The institute has been named as Institute of Technology of the Year in The Sunday Times University Guide for Ireland on numerous occasions, an accolade which it currently holds.

In 2007 the title of the head of the institute changed from "Director" to "President". In March 2008 it was announced that the Institute was applying for university status.

At present, CIT has 1,465 staff members of which 862 are academic staff. The academic staff consists of 473 permanent whole-time, 156 pro-rata part-time and 233 hourly-paid part-time members. The non-academic staff is composed of technical support, library, administrative and services staff. The non-academic staff members break down as follows: 131 Management, Clerical Admin and Library; 177 Student Services Support, including Exam Invigilators; 82 Technicians; 67 Research staff; and 96 support staff including Caretakers, Attendants and Cleaners.

Read more about Cork Institute Of Technology:  History, Main Campus, Research, Academic Alliances, CIT Rubicon Centre, CIT Prize For Innovation, Sport, Constituents, Notable Alumni

Famous quotes containing the words cork, institute and/or technology:

    When Prince William [later King William IV] was at Cork in 1787, an old officer ... dined with him, and happened to say he had been forty years in the service. The Prince with a sneer asked what he had learnt in those forty years. The old gentleman justly offended, said, “Sir, I have learnt, when I am no longer fit to fight, to make as good a retreat as I can” —and walked out of the room.
    Horace Walpole (1717–1797)

    Whenever any form of government shall become destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, & to institute new government, laying it’s foundation on such principles & organising it’s powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety & happiness.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    Radio put technology into storytelling and made it sick. TV killed it. Then you were locked into somebody else’s sighting of that story. You no longer had the benefit of making that picture for yourself, using your imagination. Storytelling brings back that humanness that we have lost with TV. You talk to children and they don’t hear you. They are television addicts. Mamas bring them home from the hospital and drag them up in front of the set and the great stare-out begins.
    Jackie Torrence (b. 1944)