Commercial

Commercial may refer to:

  • Advertising, paid classified messages in newspapers, magazines, flyers, billboards, and paid announcements over radio and television to sell a product, item or service
    • Radio advertisement, paid announcements over the radio to sell a product, item or service
    • Television advertisement, paid announcements over the television to sell a product, item or service.
  • Commerce, a system of voluntary exchange of products and services to the market
    • Trade, the trading of something of economic value such as goods, services, information or money
  • Commercial agriculture, the large-scale production of crops for sale
  • Commercial bank, a type of bank specializing in checking accounts and short-term loans
  • Commercial broadcasting, the practice of airing radio and television advertisements for profit
  • Commercial district, a part of a city where the primary use of property is for business, commerce and trade
  • Commercial Drive, Vancouver, a roadway in the city of Vancouver
  • Commercial law, the legal regulations governing transactions and related matters in business, commerce and trade
  • Commercial software, a software that is licensed for a fee
  • Commercial Solutions, a company in Edmonton
  • Commercial Township, New Jersey, in Cumberland County, New Jersey
  • Commercial vehicle, a type of vehicle for hire to transport goods or passengers
  • Strictly Commercial, a compilation album by Frank Zappa.

Famous quotes containing the word commercial:

    There is every reason to rejoice with those self-styled prophets of commercial disaster, those harbingers of gloom,
    Over the imminent lateness of the denouement that, advancing slowly, never arrives,
    At the same time keeping the door open to a tongue-in-cheek attitude on the part of the perpetrators....
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)

    If men could menstruate ... clearly, menstruation would become an enviable, boast-worthy, masculine event: Men would brag about how long and how much.... Sanitary supplies would be federally funded and free. Of course, some men would still pay for the prestige of such commercial brands as Paul Newman Tampons, Muhammed Ali’s Rope-a-Dope Pads, John Wayne Maxi Pads, and Joe Namath Jock Shields—”For Those Light Bachelor Days.”
    Gloria Steinem (b. 1934)

    The commercial class has always mistrusted verbal brilliancy and wit, deeming such qualities, perhaps with some justice, frivolous and unprofitable.
    Dorothy Nevill (1826–1913)