Coat of Arms of The Republic of Ingushetia

The coat of arms of Ingushetia was instituted on August 26, 1994. In the center of the circle is an eagle (symbolizing nobility, courage, wisdom, and faith) and a battle tower (symbol of old and young Ingushetia). In the background is Stolovaya mountain ("Matloam") on the left of the tower and Kazbek mountain ("Bashloam") on the right. Above the tower a yellow sun is shining in blue sky.

The name of the republic appears above the seal in Russian (Республика Ингушетия) and below the seal in Ingush (ГӀалгӀай Мохк).

The small triskelion near the bottom of the seal references the flag of Ingushetia.

Coats of arms of the republics of Russia
Adygea
Altai
Bashkortostan
Buryatia
Chechnya
Chuvashia
Dagestan
Ingushetia
Kabardino-Balkaria
Kalmykia
Karachay-Cherkessia
Karelia
Khakassia
Komi Republic
Mari El
Mordovia
North Ossetia-Alania
Sakha Republic
Tatarstan
Tuva
Udmurtia
Coats of arms of Europe
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recognition
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Other entities

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