Chinua Achebe - Works

Works

Novels

  • Things Fall Apart (1958)
  • No Longer at Ease (1960)
  • Arrow of God (1964)
  • A Man of the People (1966)
  • Anthills of the Savannah (1987)

Short Stories

  • Marriage Is A Private Affair (1952)
  • Dead Men's Path (1953)
  • The Sacrificial Egg and Other Stories (1953)
  • Civil Peace (1971)
  • Girls at War and Other Stories (including "Vengeful Creditor") (1973)
  • African Short Stories (editor, with C.L. Innes) (1985)
  • Heinemann Book of Contemporary African Short Stories (editor, with C.L. Innes) (1992)
  • The Voter

Poetry

  • Beware, Soul-Brother, and Other Poems (1971) (published in the US as Christmas at Biafra, and Other Poems, 1973)
  • Don't let him die: An anthology of memorial poems for Christopher Okigbo (editor, with Dubem Okafor) (1978)
  • Another Africa (1998)
  • Collected Poems Carcanet Press (2005)
  • Refugee Mother And Child
  • Vultures

Essays, Criticism, Non-Fiction and Political Commentary

  • The Novelist as Teacher (1965) - also in Hopes and Impediments
  • An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" (1975) - also in Hopes and Impediments
  • Morning Yet on Creation Day (1975)
  • The Trouble With Nigeria (1984)
  • Hopes and Impediments (1988)
  • Home and Exile (2000)
  • Education of a British protected Child (6 October 2009)
  • There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra, (11 October 2012 )

Children's Books

  • Chike and the River (1966)
  • How the Leopard Got His Claws (with John Iroaganachi) (1972)
  • The Flute (1975)
  • The Drum (1978)

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    In all Works of This, and of the Dramatic Kind, STORY, or AMUSEMENT, should be considered as little more than the Vehicle to the more necessary INSTRUCTION.
    Samuel Richardson (1689–1761)

    Do not worry about the incarnation of ideas. If you are a poet, your works will contain them without your knowledge—they will be both moral and national if you follow your inspiration freely.
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    Artists, whatever their medium, make selections from the abounding materials of life, and organize these selections into works that are under the control of the artist.... In relation to the inclusiveness and literally endless intricacy of life, art is arbitrary, symbolic and abstracted. That is its value and the source of its own kind of order and coherence.
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