Centre For Railway Information Systems

The Centre for Railway Information Systems (or CRIS) located in Chanakyapuri, New Delhi, was established as a registered society in 1986 by the Ministry of Railways of India, as an umbrella organization for all computer activities on Indian Railways (IR). CRIS today designs, develops, implements and maintains most of the important information systems of the Indian Railways.

Read more about Centre For Railway Information Systems:  History of CRIS, Work, Important Indian Railways IT Projects Being Handled By CRIS, Enterprise Application Integration

Famous quotes containing the words centre, railway, information and/or systems:

    To make our idea of morality centre on forbidden acts is to defile the imagination and to introduce into our judgments of our fellow-men a secret element of gusto.
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894)

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    The information links are like nerves that pervade and help to animate the human organism. The sensors and monitors are analogous to the human senses that put us in touch with the world. Data bases correspond to memory; the information processors perform the function of human reasoning and comprehension. Once the postmodern infrastructure is reasonably integrated, it will greatly exceed human intelligence in reach, acuity, capacity, and precision.
    Albert Borgman, U.S. educator, author. Crossing the Postmodern Divide, ch. 4, University of Chicago Press (1992)

    People stress the violence. That’s the smallest part of it. Football is brutal only from a distance. In the middle of it there’s a calm, a tranquility. The players accept pain. There’s a sense of order even at the end of a running play with bodies stewn everywhere. When the systems interlock, there’s a satisfaction to the game that can’t be duplicated. There’s a harmony.
    Don Delillo (b. 1926)