Capture

Capture may refer to:

  • Capture (chess), to remove the opponent's piece from the board by taking it with one's own piece
  • Capture (politics), situations in which a government agency created to act in the public interest instead acts in favor of other interests
  • Capture (rivers), a geomorphological phenomenon occurring when a stream or river is diverted from its own bed
  • FM capture, a phenomenon in which only the stronger of two signals near the same FM frequency will be demodulated
  • Screen capture (disambiguation), an image taken by the computer to record the visible items
  • Video capture, the process of converting an analog video signal to digital form
  • Motion capture, the process of recording movement and translating that movement onto a digital model
  • Schematic capture, a step in electronic design automation at which the electronic schematic is created by a designer
    • Capture CIS, a software tool used for circuit schematic capture
  • Capture fishery, a wild fishery in which the aquatic life is not controlled and needs to be captured or fished
  • Rule of capture, common law that determines ownership of captured natural resources including groundwater, oil, gas and game animals

Famous quotes containing the word capture:

    This is the hope of many adolescent girls—to capture a parent’s heart with love for them as they are, as people. They reject the notion of being loved just because they are the child of the parent. They want the parent to fall in love with them all over again, because being new, they deserve a new love.
    Terri Apter (20th century)

    Not even the visionary or mystical experience ever lasts very long. It is for art to capture that experience, to offer it to, in the case of literature, its readers; to be, for a secular, materialist culture, some sort of replacement for what the love of god offers in the world of faith.
    Salman Rushdie (b. 1947)

    Writing prejudicial, off-putting reviews is a precise exercise in applied black magic. The reviewer can draw free- floating disagreeable associations to a book by implying that the book is completely unimportant without saying exactly why, and carefully avoiding any clear images that could capture the reader’s full attention.
    William Burroughs (b. 1914)