Canadian Literature

Canadian literature is literature originating from Canada. Collectively it is often called CanLit.

Some criticism of Canadian literature has focused on nationalistic and regional themes, although this is only a small portion of Canadian Literary criticism. Critics against such thematic criticism in Canadian literature, such as Frank Davey, have argued that a focus on theme diminishes the appreciation of complexity of the literature produced in the country, and creates the impression that Canadian literature is sociologically-oriented.

While Canadian literature, like the literature of every nation state, is influenced by its socio-political contexts, Canadian writers have produced a variety of genres. Influences on Canadian writers are broad, both geographically and historically.

Canada's dominant cultures were originally British and French, as well as aboriginal. After Prime Minister Trudeau's "Announcement of Implementation of Policy of Multiculturalism within Bilingual Framework," in 1971, Canada gradually became home to a more diverse population of readers and writers. The country's literature has been strongly influenced by international immigration, particularly in recent decades.

Read more about Canadian Literature:  Characteristics of Canadian Literature, Categories of Canadian Literature, Traits of Canadian Literature, French-Canadian Literature, Contemporary Canadian Literature: Late 20th To 21st Century, Notable Figures, Histories of Canadian Literature, Awards

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