Bulacan State University

Bulacan State University is a state-funded institution of higher learning established in 1904, by the virtue of ACT 74 of the Philippine Commission in 1901, as an intermediate school established by the American regime, and converted into a chartered state university in 1993 by virtue of Republic Act 7665. Its main campus is located in the City of Malolos, Province of Bulacan, Philippines. It has four local satellite campuses in the province (Bustos, Sarmiento in the San Jose del Monte, Meneses in Bulakan, and Hagonoy); and an international campus in Hong Kong in People's Republic of China that offers graduate and collegiate degree courses.

The University is mandated to provide higher professional / technical training and to promote research, advanced studies and progressive leadership on Engineering, Architecture, Education, Arts and Science, Information Technology, Business Administration, Medicine, Law, Public Administration and other courses. It has been identified by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) as one of the Center for Excellence and Development in the country, and one of the Training Centers nationwide for teachers who want to be educated in areas beyond their specialization.

Read more about Bulacan State University:  Global Partners, Accredited Programs (as of As of Feb. 2011)

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